Tyre inner tubes

Virtually all tyres are now fitted without inner tubes but this does not mean they should be considered obsolete. Also, unless you have owned the vehicle for a considerable time, it is entirely possible that a previous owner had one or more tyres fitted with tubes to overcome the problem of a sightly damaged rim or a cracked tyre wall and so on.

In an extreme case where you are forced to effect a repair yourself, a tube might be your lifeline. This is not as silly as it might sound. It will not be the first time that TWO punctures occur on a bad stretch of country gravel road when you only have ONE spare. In country like that, it is wise to be prepared for the worst and just having repair plugs may not be enough.

Even if you are not that far from a town when a problem occurs, the local tyre dealer may not carry your brand or size of tyre, so unless the damage is beyond any repair, having an inner tube handy might save you having to purchase a different brand of tyre just to keep you mobile.  Constant 4WD vehicles must NOT have different sized tyres so you may be forced to change all four – an expensive fix when there may be a cheaper solution. A patch and an inner tube will probably get you home, or at least to a dealer who can match the other tyres already on the vehicle.

A final note about valves. It is now standard to use those round plastic covers over the valve stem and they do NOT have the tool requires to remove and replace a valve. In fact, it is not easy to find a valve tool so buy or scrounge one from a friendly tyre dealer to carry in your tool kit. Like many tools, you may never need to use it, but if you do, virtually no other tool will do the job!

Classic and P38 wheel nut covers

If you have ever had to change a road wheel on a Classic or P38 with the chrome/stainless covers over the wheel nuts, you will appreciate what a nuisance they can be.  Removed more than a couple of time, they distort so that the socket no longer fits OR the covers will spin without turning the nut underneath.

It may not be the perfect answer but removing the covers and leaving the plain steel nuts bare.fixes the problem permanently

Although the covers distort they are tough so if they are still on the vehicle it will take a cold chisel and hammer to remove them without damaging the steel nut underneath. The job will be easier if the entire nut and cover can be removed, placed into a vice so the cover can be cut away with an ultra-thin angle grinder disk. The trick is to cut downwards along the line of each nut face to avoid damaging the nut itself. Then pull off the cover using pliers..

The appearance of the plain nuts is obviously not as good as those with covers, but if this is a concern, prime and paint them. Good quality chrome-looking paint is available in aerosol cans from any auto store.

Unless you remove the covers on ALL wheel nuts, you will need to carry two different sockets – a lot better than not being able to change a wheel after a puncture.